OKCoin crypto exchange to donate 1000 BTC to developers

OKCoin crypto exchange was to shut down in 2017 along with Huobi by the Chinese government. We certainly have come a long way from then. Time surely changes with high uncertainty just like the prices of cryptocurrencies that you and I trade-in.

Free crypto for the taking?

Not quite. Right now, OKCoin crypto exchange is hosting a giveaway that sums up to approximately ten million ($10.6) dollars in fiat. The cryptocurrency exchange is donating one thousand (1000) Bitcoins to the bitcoin trio, namely, Bitcoin (BTC), Bitcoin Cash (BCH) and Bitcoin Satoshi Vision.

The developers at these firms are entitled to receive these tokens of appreciation (pun intended). The coins will be awarded to eleven (11) developer among which are Jimmy Song, Luke Dashjr, Ben Woosley, Bitcoin Association and Bitcoin Unlimited.

The OKCoin crypto exchange wants to pick its winners based on the peoples’ choice. Crypto enthusiasts will be voting for their favored coders and projects and each vote would grant the project, 0.02 BTC or equivalent of BCH or BSV tokens- depending on who the recipients may be.

The OKCoin crypto exchange is a natural at moving funds.

Once we reach September 27, the crypto coin bonanza will end and the spoils will be shared evenly among the members of the project. Each developer getting their share of the spoils.

The exchange has selected the recipients of the donations based on a method that they only know. They haven’t disclosed any specifics besides saying that the recipients all fit the ‘criteria’. These individuals from the aforementioned cryptocurrency organizations are ‘verified’ and have fulfilled the ‘specifications’ of the initiative.

The crypto exchange states that their initiative is not to create a rift between the companies, rather they want to celebrate the success that the industry has had with all its highs and lows along the way.

OKCoin’s website portrays a memory tree starting from 2008 when Satoshi Nakamoto published his whitepaper. The tree goes all the way to the current era when Bitcoin SV ‘Quasar’ protocol upgrades raised the default block size hard cap to two gigabytes (2GB).