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Crypto holder falls victim to $4.5M phishing scam

In this post:

  • Cryptocurrency holder has reportedly been defrauded in a staggering $4.46 million phishing scam. 
  • Blockchain security firm PeckShield has identified the address ending in “ACa7” as belonging to a malicious phishing scammer.
  • GASO explains that victims are enticed to participate in what appears to be a legitimate mining pool for cryptocurrencies.

An unfortunate cryptocurrency holder has reportedly been defrauded in a staggering $4.46 million phishing scam. The incident, which serves as a stark reminder of the risks associated with digital assets, unfolded as $4.46 million in Tether (USDT) was illicitly withdrawn from a Kraken crypto exchange wallet and subsequently transferred to an address ending with “ACa7.”

Blockchain security firm identifies crypto scammer

Blockchain security firm PeckShield has identified the address ending in “ACa7” as belonging to a malicious phishing scammer. The precise details of how the scam was executed are still under investigation, but the significant sum involved underscores the sophistication and audacity of these cyber criminals.

Another platform, Scam Sniffer, has suggested a potential link between the stolen funds and a purported “fake Coinone crypto mining exchange.” While the exact nature of this connection remains unconfirmed, it adds complexity to an already convoluted scheme.

Scam Sniffer has also provided insights into the broader impact of such scams. According to their data, these types of attacks have resulted in scammers making off with approximately $337.1 million worth of USDT, affecting as many as 21,953 individuals.

The Global Anti-Scam Organization (GASO) has shed light on the modus operandi behind approval mining scams, shedding light on how unsuspecting victims fall prey to these schemes.

When individuals create a self-custody cryptocurrency wallet, they receive a “private key” that is protected through encryption. However, fraudsters do not require access to the victim’s seed phrase or private key in this particular scam.

GASO explains that scammers employ a clever ruse. Victims are enticed to participate in what appears to be a legitimate mining pool for cryptocurrencies. To join, they are asked to click on a button, which seems harmless enough. However, this seemingly innocuous action triggers a request for a network fee, typically ranging from $10 to $50, payable in Ether (ETH). While it seems reasonable, GASO suggests it is part of to trick the user.

Disclaimer. The information provided is not trading advice. Cryptopolitan.com holds no liability for any investments made based on the information provided on this page. We strongly recommend independent research and/or consultation with a qualified professional before making any investment decisions.

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