Blockchain Industry’s Women at the Top and their Views About Diversity

Over the years, it has always been males that have dominated the industry sector.  A new trend in gender diversity has slowly transformed in the financial technology industry which pushed the dynamics from the top.

As you look at the ratio in conferences now and investment rounds, you will see that situation shows a different outlook. These events which does not have success stories about women before, is now boasting of industry game changers.

Clovyr co-founder Amber Baldet is well-known for her success as a leader of blockchain products at JP Morgan. She developed the Quorum software which is Ethereum based and designed to speed up financial databases. She left Wall Street and developed her software by starting Clovyr.

Baldet said:

“I’ve had the opportunity to talk to people who see things very differently… Being able to transition back and forth, I can help people understand each other and build stronger products together.”

Of gender diversity in the tech world she suggests, “People have tried to call out crypto as being better or worse…Diversity is a challenge across all tech subcultures.”

At IBM, the blockchain is run by women, from Marie Wieck, to Bridget van Kralingen, up to their CEO Ginni Rometty.  As Holli Haswell, spokeswoman of IBM, puts it, “We have the blockchain sisters at IBM,”

The company’s blockchain general manager is Marie Weick and has 25 years of service. She is behind many of her company’s remarkable innovations in the blockchain space.

Until today, she is still concerned about the number of women shifting to tech jobs. She also suggested that there are now less women then when she began her career with IBM.  She aims to “to create a community of champions of both women and men who proudly support women in STEM.”

Delloitte Consulting’s US blockchain space is led by Linda Pawczuk. Moving up the ladder, she said that years before, blockchain was just a desire with “the engine room stuff”.  But now, this is all about cooperation and organization that works together.

Gracie Wong who co-founded Liven alongside her brother William Wong perhaps puts it best when she suggests that blockchain needs as much expertise as it can get, particularly as it’s still in its infancy. Reflecting Baldet’s views that diversity is the key, she argues:

Gracie Wong, co-founder of Liven suggested that blockchain requires as much specialization as it can have. Echoing Baldet’s views about diversityy, she said:

“While blockchain might be a newly-named technology, the reality is it’s a combination of existing technical competencies. We need people that are great data scientists, who understand governance, who are cryptographers… and AI experts. When you combine this together in a novel way, it becomes enlivened.”